Beniot and Bacchus

It’s 52 days to Mardi Gras

Warmth. It’s a commodity we often take for granted. A power outage this morning reminded me to be especially grateful this holiday season for electricity and gas, comforts of home.

In honor of those dealing with the cold (50 degrees and sunshine makes a gentle breeze tolerable where I am in Atlanta), here’s one of my favorite artists, Tab Benoit singing Nice and Warm.

Compliments of marothhel on YouTube.

Nice and Warm by Tab Beniot
Lyrics: [From: http://www.elyrics.net ]

I can’t wait to get back home
Where the sun is always nice and warm
I can’t wait to get back home
Where the sun is always nice and warm

You know, it’s freezin’ out here
And the howlin’ wind sends a nasty chill
Through my bones

Oh, you know I
I shivered myself to sleep last night
But the cold won’t let me be
That’s when I woke up I realized that
This ain’t no place for me, no
And I can’t, I can’t wait to get back home
Where the sun is always nice and warm

You know, it’s freezin’ out here
And the howlin’ wind sends a nasty chill
Through my bones

You know, some good old friends got together
And they took me away
From this old alley
To a warm place I could stay
Oh, I can’t wait to get back home
Where the sun is always nice and warm

I’m so happy to be with you all
And that old nasty chill is gone

Now About the Krewe of Bacchus

bacchus

Bacchus formed in 1968. Back then, Rex had set the standard for Carnival floats—26 to 28-feet long and nine-feet wide—Bacchus wanted something bigger.
After cutting through the proverbial ‘red tape’ and obtaining parade permits, Bacchus designed floats that were 34 to 38 feet long and 10 to 11 feet wide. Each float displayed animation and lighting.

The parade presents more than 25 floats and includes ‘super floats’ such as the Bacchagator, Bacchasaurus, and Baccha-Whoppa.
HELP

Photo by Mathew Hinton with the Times-Picayune

The Krewe of Bacchus broke with Carnival tradition. They staged a Sunday night parade with spectacular floats not previously seen during Carnival. In addition, they select a celebrity king to lead the parade. Bacchus, the Greek god of wine has been portrayed by Andy Garcia, Drew Brees, Hulk Hogan, Elijah Wood, Harry Connick, Jr., and Nicholas Cage.

The Krewe of Bacchus wanted a complete entertainment experience for Mardi Gras goers. The subject of Marching Bands was highlighted in an earlier post and must be featured here again. Bacchus showcases about thirty of the finest and most powerful marching bands in their parade each year. Yes, thirty!
New Orleans is a musical city and Bacchus takes pride in presenting that heritage. They handpick the bands for their parade. Bands that have included The Louisiana State University Tigers, The Southern University Jaguars, Saint Augustine’s Marching 100, Alcee Fortier, Warren Easton, McDonogh 35, and Sarah T. Reed High Schools.

Head to Mardi Gras. The weather is better than New York in November for the Thanksgiving Day Parade. It’s also cheaper than traveling to the Rose Parade in California.

Laissez les bons temps rouler!

Linda Joyce
www.linda-joyce.com

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About Linda Joyce

Writing is a curious journey. You don't pick it, it picks you. See my website at www.Linda-Joyce.com to learn more about me.
This entry was posted in Mardi Gras, Music, New Orleans, Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Beniot and Bacchus

  1. Bacchus is everyone’s favorite! I remember when it paraded through the French Quarter with the flambeau carriers in front of each float – you could touch the floats because the streets were so narrow and the floats so wide. Remember Danny Kaye as king? Drunk and doing high kicks in a Roman skirt! Only in NOLA

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